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CEO Jon Winick Featured in American Banker

Lesson in high-profile foreclosure: Resist temptation to relax terms

By John Reosti
Published May 04 2018, 2∶24pm EDT

 

A high-profile foreclosure in New York is highlighting the importance of disciplined underwriting.

Preferred Bank in Los Angeles disclosed recently that it has begun foreclosure proceedings on a pair of luxury apartment buildings in Manhattan, a move that will dramatically increase the level of nonperforming assets on its balance sheet. The loans have an outstanding balance of $41.7 million.

If there’s a silver lining, it’s that the $3.8 billion-asset bank expects the financial hit to be minimal because the loan-to-value ratio — the balance divided by the appraised value at
origination — for each of the loans is below 70%.

Preferred’s experience serves a reminder of how important terms will be as loan demand increases, interest rates rise and lenders try to gain a competitive edge. Those who get too
aggressive could be burned when the economic cycle takes the inevitable turn for the worse, bankers and industry observers said.

“If you’re going to compete on commodities — that’s where the cycle starts to turn,” said Joseph Campanelli, CEO at the $2.1 billion-asset Needham Bank in Massachusetts, adding
that it can be tempting to follow the pack in areas such as rate and terms.

“Well, so-and-so is doing this rate, so let’s match it,” Campanelli said. “Or so-and-so is doing it without recourse, or doing a higher loan-to-value, let’s match it. That’s the slippery slope.”

The average loan-to-value ratio for commercial real estate deals increased to about 80% in the fourth quarter from 73% a year earlier, according to PrecisionLender, a technology firm
that helps lenders fine-tune pricing and terms. The firm evaluated more than $2 billion in quarterly volume by its clients.

To be sure, many banks are sticking to their guns when it comes to LTV.

Campanelli and Edward Czajka, Preferred’s chief financial officer, said they are seeing very few signs that lenders are throwing caution to the wind.

“I don’t see any trends pushing standards in the opposite direction,” Czajka said, adding that the average loan-to-value ratio in Preferred’s $1.3 billion-asset commercial real estate portfolio
is 56%.

“One of the things we’re seeing this go-around is a lot more liquidity going into deals,” Campanelli said. “It’s not uncommon to do a deal at 65% loan-to-value.”

Needham, like Preferred, is a significant commercial real estate lender with more than $400 million of CRE-related loans on its books.

While Preferred did not disclose the reason for the foreclosures, other media outlets have noted that Michael Paul D’Alessio, a developer and one of the properties’ owners, is facing lawsuits alleging that funds intended for a number of projects were improperly diverted for other uses.

D’Alessio is also being sued by three New York banks — Greater Hudson Bank, Westchester Bank and BNB Bank — that are trying to recoup $6.4 million through an involuntary
bankruptcy petition filed last month in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York.

D’Alessio did not respond to a request for comment.

The situation at Preferred shows how important it is to fully vet a borrower and not just an isolated deal, industry experts said.

“Problems can cascade,” said Jon Winick, CEO of the Chicago advisory firm Clark Street Capital. “Trouble with one project drags down another one. … A borrower can be highly coveted and, all of the sudden, no one wants to touch them.”

“What else does that developer or real estate group have going on?” Campanelli said. “If they’re overleveraged in other areas, you would have to conclude that, on a global basis, the
cash flows aren’t strong enough, even though the individual project looks OK.”

Preferred still considers itself a conservative lender, Czajka said, noting that the bank’s credit quality had been uniformly excellent for years. While the bank is pursuing foreclosure now, it is
is keeping all its options — including selling the loans — on the table.

In its first-quarter call report, Preferred reported $3.3 million of nonaccrual loans, or 0.11% of total loans.

Winick said he expects loan-to-value ratios to be lower on large CRE loans, which seems to be the case with Preferred’s deals. As a result, the bank’s minimal-loss forecast “seems
reasonable,” but there are no guarantees.

“It does take time to sell buildings,” Winick said. “They’re probably fine, but it’s hard to tell.”

Clark Street Capital Featured in American Banker-5/4/18

Small banks count on new appraisal rule to boost CRE lending

By Andy Peters
Published May 04 2018, 2∶27pm EDT

Community bankers are counting on a new federal rule that relaxes requirements on real estate appraisals to help them better compete with nonbank lenders on smaller commercial real estate loans, but appraisers themselves say that the change will only encourage banks to take more risks.

The three federal bank regulatory agencies last month increased the threshold for loans that require an outside appraisal on the property used as collateral from $250,000 to $500,000. The rule was last updated in 1994 and lenders say regulators changed it because it did not accurately reflect current property values.

The rule change will remove the costly appraisal requirement on tens of thousands of commercial properties, which could allow banks to make more loans in this size range, said Justin Bakst, the director of capital markets at CoStar. As of April 20, roughly 154,000 properties nationwide were each valued at between $250,000 and $500,000, according to CoStar. Those properties are valued at about $68 billion.

Though these loans should be right in community banks’ wheelhouse, many small banks have actually shied away from them because they became too costly to make once appraisal fees were factored in, said Jon Winick, CEO at Clark Street Capital, a Chicago firm that advises banks on loan sales.

“To spend $3,500 for an appraisal on a $250,000 loan, that wasn’t worth it,” Winick said.

Community bankers said that the rule change should help them better compete with insurance companies, individual investors and other nonbank lenders that were not subject to the same appraisal requirements.

Eliminating in-person appraisals for loans of less than $500,000 will both reduce costs for small banks — allowing them to offer better rates and terms — and speed up decision-making, they said.

Banks had not officially asked for an increase in the threshold since it was last updated in 1994, said Chris Capurso, an attorney at Hudson Cook in Richmond, Va., who advises banks on lending laws. But a federal law that requires federal agencies to review their regulations every decade opened the door for the current push, Capurso said.

Additionally, the price of commercial real estate has significantly increased since the financial crisis, which made it more palatable for regulators to boost the threshold, said Curt Everson, president of the South Dakota Bankers Association.

Banks will still need to value their collateral, but instead of hiring a certified independent appraiser, they now can commission an evaluation of properties in this value range using publicly available real estate data.

“Evaluations cost less than appraisals, take less time than appraisals and do not require the bank to go out and find a certified appraiser,” Capurso said. “All of this adds up to banks, especially banks with fewer resources, being able to make more CRE loans.”

However, appraisers have questioned why regulators are making it easier for banks to make CRE loans at a time when they’ve been concerned about overexposure to the sector. The rule change is “yet another relaxation of sound collateral risk policies that provide minimal benefit to financial institutions while creating significant potential risk to the financial markets as well as
consumers,” the Collateral Risk Network, which represents appraisers and risk managers, wrote in a September letter to regulators.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and the Federal Reserve Board dismissed concerns about the change posing increased risk to the financial system. “The agencies … determined that the increased threshold will not pose a threat to the safety and soundness of financial institutions,” they said in a joint press release on April 2.

Bankers in rural areas have also supported the rule change, as they believe it will help address the problem of a dearth of commercial real estate appraisers in certain sections of the country.

“The supply of licensed and certified appraisers, especially those willing to work in rural areas, has diminished,” Everson wrote in a September letter to regulators. “In too many instances … owners of small businesses on main street, farmers and ranchers seeking to restructure current year operating loans into longer term notes incur higher costs … because of appraisal threshold
requirements that have not been updated in decades.”

Some bankers had called for regulators to raise the appraisal-requirement threshold to $1 million, saying that the $500,000 cap would still shut them out of too many deals. However, Capurso noted that regulators based the $500,000 figure on the increase in the Federal Reserve’s Commercial Real Estate Price Index over the past 24 years.

“The agencies didn’t come to the limit haphazardly by merely doubling the previous limit,” Capurso said. “There’s a basis to it, and I think it’s a fair one to use.”

Clark Street Capital Promotes Robert Strandberg to Vice President

Business Wire

For Immediate Release

Clark Street Capital announces that Robert Trefle Strandberg has been promoted to Vice President after 4 years and over $500MM in loan sales with the company.

Robert Strandberg joined Clark Street Capital in November 2013 as an analyst. In his first two years Robert was key in assisting loan portfolio sales totaling over $250MM. In 2015 Robert was promoted to Senior Analyst, and now has been promoted to Vice President. Robert’s primary focus is loan portfolio sales. He works on underwriting portfolio assets, data management, analyzing assets, reserve levels, and market values of all assets to bring the best return for clients.

Robert received his bachelor’s degree from DePaul University with a double major in entrepreneurship and marketing, as well as a minor in sales. Prior to joining Clark Street Capital, Strandberg owned his own business in college and was a marketing intern for the Chicago Bulls. Robert has been a keynote speaker at a fortune 500 company annual conference, after leading the company in sales. Strandberg originates from Edina, Minnesota.

Robert currently is involved with REIA and their emerging leaders program, and is a volunteer for two local non-profits. Robert also is a member of Olympia Fields Country Club.

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